Glazed Kitchen Cabinets

One of the features lots of people like in their kitchen is a set of glazed kitchen cabinets.  Some kitchen cabinet doors are better suited for glazing than others though, and folks should make sure they understand this when shopping.

Was this helpful? Share it.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus

Bertch Oak in Sepia with a brown glaze

Glazing is done after the cabinets are either stained or painted.  In a hand glazing situation, someone covers the cabinet wood in the glazing material (like a paint or a stain) and then wipes it off.  That’s pretty much it.  It is a time consuming process though, and thus the price of kitchen cabinets that are glazed is about 15% higher than their just stained or painted equivalents.

After wiping, some of the glaze color is left on flat surfaces as well as in the nooks and crannies of the cabinets and doors.  Essentially, there are more colors available when you consider a glaze changes the hue of the overall door color.  A natural birch door with a black glaze will be tinted in an overall sense, and if you were to hold a sample of each next to each other, even if it’s a color chip that’s just a flat square block of wood.  This is even more pronounced with open grained woods like oak.   As far as doors more suitable for glazed finishes, really any of them with crevaces to fill will work.  How much the effect is enhanced depends on how ornate the cabinet door style is.  Slab doors won’t look very glazed, but something like Timberlake’s Rushmore door would work well.

Timberlake Rushmore On the left is their door with just a white paint.  On the right is the same door, but with a Butterschotch glaze.  In addition to the obvious yellow glaze in the cracks and crevases of the door, see how the whole door is kind of a different color? Timberlake Rushmore

Glazing kitchen cabinets is not an exact science.  To protect themselves from “Hey, this isn’t how the sample looked,” most manufacturers make customers sign a form showing they understand that no two glazed cabinets are going to look alike. Some variation from what a customer saw in a showroom is going to happen.  The same kind of form gets signed when customers want a rustic wood, because the knots are obviously going to look different in every piece of wood.

Was this helpful? Share it.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus

 

Written by:
Craig


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *