Door Styles Affect Kitchen Cabinet Costs

One thing that has a radical impact on kitchen cabinet costs is which door style you choose.  Sometimes subtle differences between two doors can result in very different kitchen cabinet costs. 

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Flat panel, raised panel, or more ornate stiles and rails all raise the price of a kitchen. I’ll pick on Bertch, because I’m familiar with their Legacy line and because there are so many doors that I can use as good examples of how door styles can have an effect on kitchen cabinet costs.

Bertch Embassy Kitchen Cabinet Door Embassy Embassy and Royale.  These are two very similar cabinet doors.  Both have square raised doors, and slab type drawers.  In fact, the two doors are nearly identical, except that the Royale is a full overlay door.  See HERE for a description of overlays.  That’s really the only reason a Bertch Royale kitchen cabinet costs more than a Bertch Embassy cabinet.   Bertch Royale Kitchen Cabinet Door Royale
Bertch Royale Kitchen Cabinet Door Royale Next I’ll introduce Stanford.  A Bertch Stanford kitchen cabinet costs even more than a cabinet in the Royale door style.  Can you see why?  That’s RIGHT!  The drawer is no longer just a slab.  It too is square raised, and the kitchen cabinet costs are higher because of it.   Bertch Stanford Stanford
Bertch Stanford Stanford Ok, last round.  Now we’ll look at Stanford vs. Craftwood.  Craftwood, in addition to the square raised door and square raised drawer front, has a piece of molding around the panel.  It is because of this fancy-schmancy-ness that a kitchen cabinet costs more for Craftwood than Stanford.  Bertch Craftwood is actually in the Legacy line’s most expensive pricing bracket. Bertch Craftwood Craftwood

 

Bertch St Thomas

 

All we’ve looked at is the square raised door style, but the process of figuring which kitchen cabinet costs more at a glance applies to the other kinds of doors too. If all things are equal (flat or raised panel, same wood species, etc) an arch or cathedral kitchen cabinet costs maybe a smidgen more than it’s square raised or square flat-panel counterpart. 

Sometimes, depending on the company, the cabinet costs the same.  It’s when you start changing things up (like adding the molding around the panel, making the drawer something other than a slab) that the kitchen cabinet costs start to vary much.   Another thing to watch for is special routing around the perimeter, inner or outer or both, of the stiles and rails.  Something like the difference between a St Thomas (shown left) and Stanford (shown above).  These door styles happen to cost the same, but in some manufacturers’ lines the routing could make the ktichen cabinet costs differ slightly.          

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Written by:
Craig


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